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Displaying courses 101 - 110 of 427 in total
3
credits

HIS 107 - History of American Life II

Buffalo State | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
The new South; reunion, readjustment, and constitutional freedoms; the West; the economic revolution; the urban society; politics in the Gilded Age; America's emergence as a world power; the Progressive Era; World War I and its aftermath; the 1920s; the New Deal; from isolationism to globalism; World War II; postwar adjustments; the Kennedy and Johnson years; resurgent Republicanism.
Section: 1135
3
credits

POS 102 - American National Government

Monroe / Community College | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
This course is designated as Writing Intensive. This course is a study of the American political system, its constitutional foundation, national institutions and contemporary issues. This course examines how the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, in addition to other national institutions, interact with each other and citizens.
Section: SL1
4
credits

AAAS 280B - The Chinese Experience In The Americas

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
This course explores the Chinese experience in the Americas using interdisciplinary sources and approaches. Major themes and issues will be examined through scholarly works in history and the social sciences, augmented by Chinese American arts, films, and literature. The course investigates "the Chinese experience" in concrete terms by historicizing different forms of Chinese labor, political struggles, and different forms of Chinese communities that are in constant flux, reinvention, and transformation. "Chinatown" and "the Chinese" in this context will be looked at as sociological, historical, and cultural artifacts that can be located in multiple regions in the Americas, including, but not limited to, the United States, Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, and other reified sites of the mythical "Gold Mountain."
Section: 01
4
credits

ANTH 114 - Language, Culture, And Communication In The United States

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
This course is an introduction to theories and methods in Linguistic Anthropology. We focus on the role of language in the socio-historical production of identities (e.g. ethnicity, race, gender, class) and ideologies (e.g. nationality, citizenship, democracy), as well as the prominent perspectives on language acquisition, socialization, semiotics, and contextualization currently used by ethnographers of language such as Edward Sapir and Deborah Cameron and linguists such as Ferdinand Sassaure, Roman Jakobson, and Pierre Bourideu. This course requires students to complete daily lectures (with online assignments), two exams, and three, 3-5 page argument mappings of articles in contemporary Linguistic Anthropology.
Section: 91
4
credits

ANTH 124A - Multiculturalism In The 21st Century

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
This course includes readings and class discussions online about diversity in America, discarding race and dealing with racism, and the different ethnic groups of our society. Covers the history, status and social interrelations amongst major ethnic groups in American society including European Americans, Native Americans, African Americans, Latinos/as, and Asian Americans. Explores the issues involved with multiculturalism.
Section: 02
4
credits

ENG 300L - Nasty Women Writers

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
Since Donald Trump called Hillary Clinton a "nasty woman" during the final 2016 Presidential debate, women have adopted that label as a sarcastic rallying cry against the resurgence of sexism and misogyny in public discourse. Women writers, of course, have been similarly denigrated since putting pen to paper, particularly when their work has challenged the patriarchal status quo. Anne Bradstreet famously wrote in her 1650 poem "Prologue," "I am obnoxious to each carping tongue / Who says my hand a needle better fits." In this class, we will consider women writers whose work has pushed back against oppressive structures from slavery to the policing of female bodies and sexuality, considering how their writing does so and, in some cases, sparked backlash from male writers and critics. We will begin by considering poetry by Sappho, the "mother" of literature in the Western tradition, and continue with selected writers from the United States and Great Britain from the 17th to 21st centuries: poetry by Phillis Wheatley, Anne Bradstreet, Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Plath, Audre Lorde, Wendy Xu, Claudia Rankine (including her collection "Citizen"), Claudia Cortese, and others; fiction by Kate Chopin, Mary Shelley (including "Frankenstein"), Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Carmen Maria Machado; and essays by Jenny Zhang, Leslie Jamison, Roxane Gay, and others.
Section: 01
4
credits

GEOG 103 - Multi-Cultural Geographies Of The United States

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
Overview of historical and contemporary patterns of multicultural geography within the U.S. Provides students an understanding of the evolution of several American subcultures (white European, Latino, Asian and Black) through the prism of geography, both in broad context and in separate analyses of socio-economic well-being over time and between racial/ethnic groups. The student is constantly reminded of the question: How do social institutions, the political economy, and degree of opportunity affect where and how well people live? Students learn to better understand patterns of the past and of today from a geographic perspective.
Section: 91
4
credits

HIST 103A - Foundations Of America

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
This course examines the history of the United States from pre-colonization North America through Reconstruction. Through a combination of readings, video lectures, films, and online discussion boards, students will explore the captivating and oftentimes contentious interactions between Native Americans, Europeans and Africans, emphasizing the wide array of people who shaped American ideals and realities. Major topics include cross-cultural colonial encounters, the rise of the Atlantic world, the causes and aftermath of the American Revolution, economic expansion, changes within the household, the growth of American slavery, changing roles for women, the growth in sectionalism in the American Civil War, and the challenges of Reconstruction. Assignments include weekly discussion responses, reading quizzes, and two exams.
Section: 02
4
credits

HIST 104A - Modern American Civilization

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
This introductory American history course surveys US history from the end of the Civil War through recent times (approximately 2001). The course explores the making and reshaping of American institutions, people, environment, government, politics, and culture throughout that time period, paying particular attention to major developments and movements of culture, social issues, politics, as well as the historical trifecta of race, class, and gender. Aside from key primary sources that illuminate and contextualize sweeping themes introduced in pre-recorded lectures and written discussions, students will be invited to explore "American Yawp," a free online textbook to provide historical background for the course. From the outset, students will also select two historical novels, major publications, or exposes from a preset list to complete the major writing assignment for the course. Select audio and visual sources will also be utilized for evaluations and content provision for students, all of which will be made accessible through "Kanopy," the campus' free media streaming service. Course grades will be comprised of seven quizzes, participation in online discussion boards (original posts and interaction with peers), three one-page primary source analysis exercises, and a short essay (5-7 pages) comparing at least two primary sources from a particular historical time period in context of their relation to a major historical debate, event, or dynamic.
Section: 01
4
credits

ITAL 481U - The Immigration Experience

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2020
July 6, 2020 — 
This course will examine the immigration experience, as reflected in literary works of various genres, and seek to identify the unifying characteristics of the works of immigrant writers: what experiences are universal to immigrants from a wide variety of sending countries and cultures? What is lost and what gained in the assimilation and integration processes? How did different ethnic groups respond to the process and how are the similarities and differences reflected in the literary documents they have produced? What does it mean to write about the immigration process and how does the act of writing serve to validate and/or work through certain experiences and ordeals common to most immigrants? Some of the common themes we will examine are: prejudice and racism, exploitative labor, and the female immigrant's role within the family structure as it contrasts with the old world conception of a woman's place in the home and community.
Section: 01