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Displaying courses 111 - 120 of 341 in total
3
credits

HIS 106 - America Today

Nassau / Community College | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
This course deals with America in the nuclear age, its recovery from World War II and its growing domination of the Western world. The course covers the dramatic changes in American society at home and its entanglements abroad in an effort to contain Russian and Chinese power. Domestic transformation of the Kennedy-Johnson period, the upheaval of Watergate, the Reagan "revolution", and contemporary issues in American life conclude the course.
Section: OLA
4
credits

ANTH 114 - Language, Culture, And Communication In The United States

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
This course is an introduction to theories and methods in Linguistic Anthropology. We focus on the role of language in the socio-historical production of identities (e.g. ethnicity, race, gender, class) and ideologies (e.g. nationality, citizenship, democracy), as well as the prominent perspectives on language acquisition, socialization, semiotics, and contextualization currently used by ethnographers of language such as Edward Sapir and Deborah Cameron and linguists such as Ferdinand Sassaure, Roman Jakobson, and Pierre Bourideu. This course requires students to complete daily lectures (with online assignments), two exams, and three, 3-5 page argument mappings of articles in contemporary Linguistic Anthropology.
Section: 90
4
credits

ANTH 124A - Medical Anthropology for Pre-Health Students

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
Readings and class discussions online about diversity in America, discarding race and dealing with racism, and the different ethnic groups of our society. Covers the history, status and social interrelations amongst major ethnic groups in American society including European Americans, Native Americans, African Americans, Latinos/as, and Asian Americans. Explores the issues involved with multiculturalism.
Section: 01
4
credits

ENG 300W - Nasty Women Writers

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
Since Donald Trump called Hillary Clinton a "nasty woman" during the final 2016 Presidential debate, women have adopted that label as a sarcastic rallying cry against the resurgence of sexism and misogyny in public discourse. Women writers, of course, have been similarly denigrated since putting pen to paper, particularly when their work has challenged the patriarchal status quo. Anne Bradstreet famously wrote in her 1650 poem "Prologue:" "I am obnoxious to each carping tongue / Who says my hand a needle better fits." In this class, we will consider women writers whose work has pushed back against oppressive structures from slavery to the policing of female bodies and sexuality, considering how their writing does so and, in some cases, sparked backlash from male writers and critics. We will begin by considering poetry by Sappho, the "mother" of literature in the Western tradition, and continue with selected writers from the United States and Great Britain from the 17th to 21st centuries: poetry by Phillis Wheatley, Anne Bradstreet, Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Plath, Audre Lorde, Wendy Xu, Claudia Rankine (including her collection "Citizen"), Claudia Cortese, and others; fiction by Kate Chopin, Mary Shelley (including "Frankenstein"), Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Carmen Maria Machado, and others; and essays by Jenny Zhang, Leslie Jamison, Roxane Gay, and others.
Section: 01
4
credits

GEOG 103 - Multi-Cultural Geographies Of The United States

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
Overview of historical and contemporary patterns of multicultural geography within the U.S. Provides students an understanding of the evolution of several American subcultures (White European, Latino, Asian and Black) through the prism of geography, both in broad context and in separate analyses of socio-economic well-being over time and between racial/ethnic groups. The student is constantly reminded of the question: How do social institutions, the political economy, and degree of opportunity affect where and how well people live? Students learn to better understand patterns of the past and of today from a geographic perspective.
Section: 90
4
credits

HIST 103A - Foundations Of America

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
This course surveys the origins and development of the United States as a society and nation from before its foundations in pre-colonial North America to the aftermath of the Civil War. Lessons will center on oftentimes contentious and violent interactions of peoples in North America and how those conflicts contributed to the diversity of ideologies, institutions, and socio-cultural dynamics that serve as the foundation for the United States. Students will engage with primary and secondary source readings that will focus on the interaction of Native American, European, Colonial, and African populations and the roles they played in the development of early American history. Students will also analyze how gender, race, sexuality, class, and religious ideology shaped the identity of early America. Specific topics covered by the course include, but are note limited to: initial contact and conflict between Native Americans and Europeans, colonial development, the American Revolution, the Constitution, the rise of sectionalism, the significance of slavery in the development of the United States, the American Civil War, and Reconstruction and its long-lasting legacies. The required textbook for the course is "America's History Vol. I, 8th edition," by Henretta, Hinderaker, Edwards, and Self. Supplemental readings and primary sources will be provided by the instructor via MyCourses.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 104A - Modern American Civilization

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
This course offers a broad overview of U.S. history from the end of the Civil War through the twenty first century. Throughout this course, students will learn about industrialization, urbanization, suburbanization, immigration, political and social reform, consumption and mass culture, foreign policy and war, social movements such as women's rights and civil rights, economic changes, and cultural shifts. We will pay particular attention to what it means to be a multiracial, multiethnic, and multicultural democracy and explore how race, class, and gender relations shifted during the twentieth century. Students will not only learn about the events that happened in the past but also learn to think critically about how historians' interpretations vary. To do this, we will compare primary source evidence with openly politicized and mainstream interpretations of the past (secondary readings). We will discuss the role of objectivity in history and throughout the course learn to think, talk, and write like a historian. This course will also include online lectures, textbook and primary source readings, and short film clips and online visual history exhibits. In addition to online discussion and participation, students will be assigned primary source analysis assignments and weekly quizzes.
Section: 02
4
credits

JUST 352 - American Jewish Thought

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
This course offers both a historical and a theological study of the American Jewish community, from its origins through contemporary times. We engage central historical and sociological studies of American Jews in relation to Protestant, Catholic, and Baptist Americans, as well as other minority groups. We will also examine central philosophical and theological texts in American Judaism. Students will also read short works of American Jewish literature. We will examine how specific Judaic thinkers transform aspects of the Judaic tradition to fit the challenges of religious life in the modern and democratic age, and the response(s) to this transformation. Questions include: the relationship between theology and democratic culture, challenges to inherited religious traditions, the influence of feminist thought on religious practice, and the place and function of religious authority. The final third of the term will be spent analyzing rabbinic rulings on homosexuality and same-sex marriage.
Section: 01
4
credits

LACS 384A - Hip Hop And Resistance

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
Students will explore the early roots of Hip Hop music in the U.S., in the context of growing counter-culture and resistance movements. Originating from Black, Latinx and Caribbean neighborhoods in New York City in the late 1970s/early1980s, Hip Hop was influenced by Latinx and Caribbean beats like bomba, disco, and poetry amidst local and global social and economic crises and an increasingly militarized police force. Among topics discussed in the class will be the relationship between Hip Hop, policing, the drug war, housing displacement, squatting, graffiti and the "right to the city." The course will also trace how Hip Hop has become a globalized expression of the Black, Latinx and Caribbean urban experience across the Americas.
Section: 01
4
credits

LING 114 - Language, Culture, And Communication In The United States

Binghamton / University Center | Summer 2019
May 28, 2019 — 
This course is an introduction to theories and methods in Linguistic Anthropology. We focus on the role of language in the socio-historical production of identities (e.g. ethnicity, race, gender, class) and ideologies (e.g. nationality, citizenship, democracy), as well as the prominent perspectives on language acquisition, socialization, semiotics, and contextualization currently used by ethnographers of language such as Edward Sapir and Deborah Cameron and linguists such as Ferdinand Sassaure, Roman Jakobson, and Pierre Bourideu. This course requires students to complete daily lectures (with online assignments), two exams, and three, 3-5 page argument mappings of articles in contemporary Linguistic Anthropology.
Section: 90