HOME » COURSES » SEARCH RESULTS
Displaying courses 131 - 140 of 395 in total
4
credits

HIST 3190 - Fashion in U.S. History

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
This study will survey the ways in which fashion in the United States has been shaped by major developments in American history. Beginning with the development of the textile industry, this course will place fashion and the fashion industry within social, cultural and economic frameworks, and will cover a variety of topics including: industrialization, immigration, 'becoming American', labor movements, gender and the women's movement, class differentiations, haute couture, consumer culture, and the influence of the entertainment industry and globalization on the American fashion, textile and apparel industries. This course was previously HIS-243194 Fashion in U.S. History.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3262 - The Hudson River and its Valley: Advanced

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
In this course, we will examine American History from the discovery of the Hudson River by Europeans to the present day by studying the river, its valley, and the places directly connected to that large swathe of New York State. We will see how far and wide its impact stretched as we learn how to think about the discipline of History; understand its many connections; and to understand why history is so important to civilization. Lastly, we will study the notion of local history. This course will consider the national and international role of the Hudson River and its valley. Students in this advanced level course will be expected to read and write at an advanced level.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3345 - Modern American History

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
Modern American History is a survey course, which covers events in American history from Reconstruction in the south in 1877 through the present. Students will examine various political, social and cultural themes in this course, including Reconstruction, western settlement and the frontier, industrialization, immigration, American imperialism and world power, the Progressive movement, WW I, the Roaring Twenties, the Depression, the New Deal, WW II, the Cold War and Nuclear Age, the 1950s, Civil Rights, the 1960s, Vietnam, and the resurgence of conservatism in the 1980s. Critical reading skills and the ability to analyze and evaluate primary and secondary historical sources and produce written interpretations will be emphasized. This course was previously HIS-243214 Modern American History.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3440 - American Ethnic History

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
Study a narrative history of the United States in the context of native, captive, and immigrant ethnic groups and their interactions with one another. Ethnic history serves as a vehicle for understanding both unity and diversity in American society and reveals the complexities of political, economic, social and cultural issues, as well as America's evolving relationship with the rest of the world. Sections may address a particular ethnicity, issue, or set of issues. After consultation with their advisor, students may complete more than one the section listed under this title. This course was previously HIS-243234 American Ethnic History.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3550 - Global U.S. History

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
This course places the United States in the historic, political, cultural, and social currents of the world. It invites students to explore the historic processes that have shaped some key themes and dynamics of U.S. history from both internal and external points of view. We will view the United States less as an independent entity and more as a part of a world community. Such a perspective creates an opportunity to deepen the basic narrative of the American experience by internationalizing it, while also helping us understand how such aspects of U.S. society as churches, small businesses, neighborhoods, cultural communities, and mass media might be forces in shaping world politics. We will make the movements of people in and through the Americas, the stories of how the United States came to be 50 states (and some territories), and the precarious role of early 21st century world leadership the central themes of the study. Students are encouraged to bring to this course a curiosity about America's historic place in the world, a desire to strengthen Historical Studies research and writing skills, and a willingness to think outside the box. This course was previously HIS-243394 .
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3590 - Hip Hop America: The Evolution of a Cultural Movement

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
How do history and Hip Hop connect? This course explores that question through a study of Hip Hop in the U.S. The course will begin with a look at the 1970's Bronx, where Hip Hop originated, and will then journey across New York City and the United States, exploring how the beats and breaks of the Bronx evolved into both an artistic genre as well as a political and cultural movement. We will study 1) the social conditions of the 1970's Bronx that enabled the emergence of Hip Hop; 2) the 1980's growth of the genre through the commercialization of rap; 3) the early 21st century uses of Hip Hop as a vehicle for political organizing, education, community outreach, and entrepreneurialism in cities across the U.S.; 4) the challenge of balancing the political potential of Hip Hop against the commercial context of popular arts; and 5) the harnessing of Hip Hop by churches and other religious organizations as a vehicle for personal uplift and empowerment. This course was previously HIS-243554 Hip-Hop America: The Evolution of a Cultural Movement.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 4005 - Mad Men Mad Women: History of Women in the Twentieth Century

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
This course will examine the history of women in the 1960s using the visual narrative of AMC’s Emmy Award-winning show, Mad Men. The backdrop – a fictional Madison Avenue advertising firm in March 1960 – on its surface seems to be a story of the “mad men”. Yet, a central focus of the show is the evolution of women’s lives in this dynamic period of American History. We will examine the transformation of the lives of women examining historical primary source materials. Some of these themes include: Women in pre war and postwar America, “the problem with no name”, women’s changing landscape in the workplace and the home, the sexual revolution, and the rise of feminism.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 4010 - Rock and Roll History

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
We will carefully examine American culture through the lens of Rock and Roll. We will examine Rock and Roll as a part of culture and how it changed perceptions and norms. We will look at what makes rock and roll precisely unique. We will connect themes, ideas and main concepts that weave our diverse American tapestry. Specifically, this study will examine Rock and Roll and revolution fit together and how these ideas are still relevant today. As a class we will examine the lives of places, events, and people, it will be your job to find your own sense of historical belonging. Why should we care about Rock and Roll? Students will explore the History of Rock and Roll in the United States though listening, reading and viewing. Students will be required to analyze primary documents, music and videos from the different time periods and connect the historical themes.
Section: 01
4
credits

LABR 3072 - United States Labor History

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
This course examines the roles of workers and their organizations from colonial American times to the present. The goals are to develop informed and critical analyses of these historical developments and to draw conclusions about them in ways that make sense to the student. Students will critically examine and discuss labor as a form of economic, political, and social expression; will learn how to identify, understand, and appreciate labor traditions in their historical, critical, and socio-cultural contexts; and will learn to differentiate economic, political, social, and organizational traditions. The course will also consider the manner in which both unionized and non-unionized work developed. This will include discussing how gender, race, and ethnicity have influenced workers in America. Course activities require students to observe, discuss and write about labor from critical and analytical perspectives, including cultural, historical, sociological, political, and philosophical frameworks. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course fulfills SUNY American History General Education Requirements. This course is offered online. This course was previously LAB-263704 United States Labor History.
Section: 01
4
credits

POLI 3005 - America's Founding Ideas

Empire State College / University College | Fall 2019
September 3, 2019 — 
The founding of the United States of America is one of the defining events of world history, and the political ideas of the founding generation continue to be invoked all manner of political debate. But questions about the founding generation remain: What did Thomas Jefferson and James Madison really think about politics? How did the American founding generation understand terms like 'liberty,' 'democracy,' and 'freedom?' This course is designed to separate fact from fiction by introducing students to the intellectual, economic, and social context of the American founding. This course was previously SOC-263454 America's Founding Ideas.
Section: 01