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Displaying courses 411 - 420 of 421 in total
3
credits

HIST 105 - Modern U.S. History

Canton / Technology College | Winter 2017-18
December 20, 2017 — 
This course deals with the leading aspects of American history from the Civil War to the present. Attention is given to political institutions, diplomatic initiatives and constitutional questions, as well as broader economic, social, cultural, religious, and intellectual trends. This course also focuses on what is unique in the American historical experience, and relates American history to the global context.
Section: 0W3
3
credits

HIST 103 - Early American History

Canton / Technology College | Winter 2017-18
December 20, 2017 — 
This course deals with the leading aspects of American history from the pre-colonial era through the end of the Civil War. Attention is given to political institutions, diplomatic initiatives and constitutional questions, as well as broader economic, social, cultural, religious, and intellectual trends. This course also focuses on what is unique in the American historical experience, and relates American history to the global context.
Section: 0W3
3
credits

HIS 150 - American History to 1877

Jefferson / Community College | Winter 2017-18
December 18, 2017 — 
This course provides a survey of the major social, economic, political, cultural, and intellectual dynamics that have shaped the American experience through Reconstruction. It is recommended that students take this course only after completing any required noncredit coursework in reading (CLS).
Section: 1
3
credits

HIS 151 - American History 1877 to Present

Jefferson / Community College | Winter 2017-18
December 18, 2017 — 
This course provides a survey of the major social, economic, political, cultural, and intellectual dynamics that have shaped the American experience since Reconstruction. It is recommended that students take this course only after completing any required noncredit coursework in reading (CLS).
Section: 1
3
credits

HIS 104 - History of United States II

Dutchess / Community College | Winter 2017-18
December 18, 2017 — 
The study of American political, social and intellectual development from 1865 to the present. Topics covered are Reconstruction, the industrial and transportation revolution, the labor movement, the crisis in agriculture, expansion and the new Manifest Destiny, the Progressive Movement, the Twenties, the Great War, the Great Depression and New Deal, the Second World War, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War and the Protest Movements of the 1960s, and the Consolidation and Conservative Resurgence of the 1970s and 1980s.
Section: 61A
4
credits

ECON 144 - Economics Of Poverty And Discrimination

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2017-18
December 18, 2017 — 
A module-based, topics-driven course examining the dual phenomena of poverty and discrimination, largely through the framework of traditional economic models of human behavior. Students explore key topics in multi-dimensional fashion, beginning with text-based lecture presentations and concluding with assigned readings and/or Internet research assignments. Readings and assignments serve as "case studies" of the experiences of African, Asian, European, Hispanic, Latino and Native Americans in the United States, as related to the themes of material and/or financial poverty and specific forms of discrimination. Of particular interest are the ways in which various societal institutions have affected these ethnic groups, and how they have, in turn, affected those same institutions. Various tools of economic analysis are developed and used to craft a "positive" as well as "normative" treatment of the characteristics, root causes and resulting effects, and prescriptive treatments of poverty and discrimination. Course is taught using Blackboard with each day reading and lecture assignment posted daily. Items remain available for students to access at a time of the day of their choosing. Weekly exams, which are available for a limited posted of time. Also online discussions and "blog" sessions in which the students and instructor talk about issues related to poverty and discrimination in a less formal manner. Students are usually asked to submit a paper or a series of essays to demonstrate their understanding of the basic models and concepts presented in the lecture notes.
Section: 01
4
credits

GEOG 103 - Multi-Cultural Geographies Of The United States

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2017-18
December 18, 2017 — 
Overview of historical and contemporary patterns of multicultural geography within the U.S. Provides students an understanding of the evolution of several American subcultures (white European, Latino, Asian and Black) through the prism of geography, both in broad context and in separate analyses of socio-economic well-being over time and between racial/ethnic groups. The student is constantly reminded of the question: How do social institutions, the political economy, and degree of opportunity affect where and how well people live? Students learn to better understand patterns of the past and of today from a geographic perspective.
Section: 90
4
credits

HDEV 374 - Psychology of HIV And AIDS

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2017-18
December 18, 2017 — 
This course will examine psychological aspects of the AIDS epidemic in the United States with a focus on psychological theory and research in this area. Students also will explore the complexities of the AIDS epidemic within the context of the politics of health. A specific emphasis will be placed on a critique of micro- and macro- level processes that influence inequalities in AIDS based on race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexualities. Students will engage in critical analysis and thoughtful reflection in exploring and challenging their values, assumptions, perceptions, and biases related to AIDS. The course will focus on societal processes from the perspective of four groups (i.e. Asians, Blacks, Latino/as, Native Americans) and will demonstrate how these groups have experienced and have had an impact on key institutional structures of U.S. society (e.g. legal, political, economic, and educational) with respect to the AIDS epidemic. Within this context, students will examine the following topics: HIV virology, clinical course, medical treatments, epidemiology, and antibody testing; integrating primary and behavioral health care; assessment issues and strategies; intervention strategies; prevention issues for the mental health provider; HIV, mental health, and prisons; the interface of HIV and substance use; and HIV in the Greater Binghamton area. Students should provide considerable preparation in planning and structuring their schedules for the rigors of this course. This course requires that students complete pre- and post-course readings and assignments.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 264 - Immigration And Ethnicity In United States History

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2017-18
December 18, 2017 — 
This course examines what it means to be an American and why the criterion for becoming an American has changed throughout U.S. history. We will consider why immigrants and migrants were perceived as racial and ethnic "others" and we'll think critically about what it means to be a multiracial, multiethnic, and multicultural nation. This course will cover snapshots of major moments of immigration throughout U.S. history, beginning with colonial settlement and moving forward into the 20th century restrictions on immigration. The course will cover such historical developments as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the National Origins Act of 1924, WWII developments like the Bracero Program and Japanese Internment, and the Immigration Act of 1965. We will conclude with a survey of recent developments in immigration reform like family reunification, undocumented immigration, the DREAM act, etc. Some themes that will be discussed are racism and nativism; push and pull factors for immigration; race and the law; urbanization and industrialization; work and class; gender and family dynamics; undocumented or illegal immigration; and chain, circular, and return migration patterns. Course readings will consist of letters, memoirs, diaries, and newspaper articles written by immigrants and oral interviews of immigrants, as well as a variety of secondary readings on immigration that discuss how race, class, and gender factored into the immigration process and settlement. Students will also be given an opportunity to conduct an oral interview with a recent immigrant and examine that immigrant's history as it relates to the course themes.
Section: 01
4
credits

JUST 351 - Jewish New York

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2017-18
December 18, 2017 — 
An exploration of why Eastern European Jews came to New York in the era of mass migration and what they made of city life once they arrived. Jewish New York is a study in both urban and immigrant history: examining how a newly arrived society shaped and responded to America's signature metropolis in an urban moment of extraordinary dynamism. (All material presented in English.)
Section: 01