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Displaying courses 451 - 460 of 527 in total
4
credits

HIST 2025 - US History to 1865: What Does it Mean to be a Free Nation?

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
What was life like for the first European colonists? What were the ideas, events and actions that led to the American Revolution? What did the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution mean to the people who wrote it? How did the idea of liberty and the practice of slavery develop and co-exist? What was it like to be a woman, an immigrant, a slave, or a poor worker in America’s formative years? This course will explore such questions. In doing so, we will meet and hear the voices of a diverse group of people ranging from well-known figures such as Thomas Jefferson and George Washington to others who by law and custom were excluded from the political process but still made a significant impact upon our nation’s history and identity. Learning Outcomes: 1. Identify the key historical events and individuals that constitute the basic narrative of American history, and how these events affected the emergent nation's relationship with the world. 2. Describe and discuss some of the main political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of early America. 3. Discuss and evaluate the significance of race, ethnicity, gender, and class in contributing to the political, socio-economic, and cultural fabric of the United States in its early years.
Section: 01
3
credits

HIST 2030 - US History From 1865 to the Present

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
In 1865, the United States was in tatters. Civil War had divided the nation into two, and even after the war ended, deep rifts remained between whites and blacks, immigrants and 'natives,' and the descendants of European settlers and indigenous Americans. The meaning of a simple word - freedom - lies at the core of these rifts and that word will guide our study. The course begins with a look at how the meaning of freedom changed in the Reconstruction era before moving into an exploration of America’s westward and overseas expansion in the late 19th century, the economic booms and busts of the period between the two world wars, the social upheavals of the civil rights movements of the 1960s, and the conservative turn of the post-Reagan era. Learning Outcomes: 1.Describe and discuss some of the main political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of the United States since the Civil War. 2.Discuss and evaluate the significance of race, ethnicity, gender, and class in contributing to the political, socio-economic, and cultural fabric of the United States since the Civil War. 3. Examine how key historical events affected the emergent nation's relationship with the world.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3115 - American Women's History

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
Sections might include: America in the Age of Revolution; History of African-American Women; Women’s Issues in American History; The Women’s Suffrage Movement. This course examines the histories of women in the U.S., from the time of Europeans' first contact with the New World to the present. Students will explore how historical events and circumstances have shaped gender roles and the structure of family relationships, as well as the diversity of women's experiences as a result of differing cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds and socioeconomic status. Students might focus on women's daily lives, their interactions with their families and other social institutions (e.g. government, religion, etc...), women's activism, and women's impact on sociopolitical structures in the United States, and in the world today. After consultation with their advisors, students may complete more than one of the sections listed under this title. Prerequisite(s): Some introductory level coursework in U.S. History is recommended but not required for this course. Critical reading skills and the ability to analyze and evaluate primary and secondary historical sources and produce written interpretations will be emphasized. Learning Outcomes: 1. Identify and discuss key historic moments in the histories of women in the U.S. 2. Apply theories of gender as an ordering principle to critique conventional historical narratives and their treatment of women. 3. Prepare original academic works on topics related to women's histories through the use of primary and secondary documents, audiovisual sources, and other materials. 4. Synthesize and critique various sources and incorporate them into clearly-stated conclusions in well-written papers organized around a particular topic.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3190 - Fashion in U.S. History

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
This study will survey the ways in which fashion in the United States has been shaped by major developments in American history. Beginning with the development of the textile industry, this course will place fashion and the fashion industry within social, cultural and economic frameworks, and will cover a variety of topics including: industrialization, immigration, 'becoming American', labor movements, gender and the women's movement, class differentiations, haute couture, consumer culture, and the influence of the entertainment industry and globalization on the American fashion, textile and apparel industries. Learning Outcomes: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the trajectory of fashion in American history, which will require both a knowledge of various aspects of fashion and fashion industry and of major trends in American history. 2. Critically examine how fashion 'works' within the context of American history - what purposes it serves, how it changes, how it reflects culture, and how it may be analyzed as a cultural and historical text. 3. Synthesize and critique various sources and incorporate them into clearly-stated conclusions in well-written papers organized around a particular topic.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3345 - Modern American History

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
Modern American History is a survey course, which covers events in American history from Reconstruction in the south in 1877 through the present. Students will examine various political, social and cultural themes in this course, including Reconstruction, western settlement and the frontier, industrialization, immigration, American imperialism and world power, the Progressive movement, WW I, the Roaring Twenties, the Depression, the New Deal, WW II, the Cold War and Nuclear Age, the 1950s, Civil Rights, the 1960s, Vietnam, and the resurgence of conservatism in the 1980s. Critical reading skills and the ability to analyze and evaluate primary and secondary historical sources and produce written interpretations will be emphasized. Learning Outcomes: 1. Describe and interpret a narrative of American history from 1865 with attention to some of the various political, economic, social, and cultural themes that contribute to a narrative that is both unified and diverse. 2. Recognize institutions in American society (such as those of the economy, the law, the government) and will identify how those institutions have impacted the different groups that compose American society during this period. 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the interactions between America and the world during and after the Civil War. 4. Synthesize and critique various sources and incorporate them into clearly-stated conclusions in well-written papers organized
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3380 - Nature in American History

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
This course explores the history of changing relationships between American culture and its environment, as that relationship has been manifest physically as well as conceptually. Students will gain familiarity with the main eras and episodes of American history as they relate to American culture’s grounding in nature: the European encounter with a (supposedly) virgin wilderness; the rapid exploitation of resources that accompanied westward and industrial expansion; the closing of the frontier and the development of resource conservationism; continued industrialization of the nature-culture relationship through nearly a century of war; the modern tension between economics and a concern for ecological health and balance. Learning Outcomes: 1. Interpret the basic narrative of American history as it pertains particularly to the interconnections of environment, culture and history. 2. Analyze the role of common institutions in American society in interactions with physical and conceptual manifestations of nature. 3. Evaluate the evolving relationship between America and the world through the lens of nature. 4. Synthesize and critique various sources and incorporate them into clearly-stated conclusions in well-written papers organized around a particular topic.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3440 - American Ethnic History

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
Study a narrative history of the United States in the context of native, captive, and immigrant ethnic groups and their interactions with one another. Ethnic history serves as a vehicle for understanding both unity and diversity in American society and reveals the complexities of political, economic, social and cultural issues, as well as America's evolving relationship with the rest of the world. Sections may address a particular ethnicity, issue, or set of issues. After consultation with their advisor, students may complete more than one the section listed under this title. Learning Outcomes: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of how the multi-ethnic and multi-cultural roots of American society form an integral part of the basic narrative of American history. 2. Identify and discuss key events and legislation in defining inclusion and exclusion in American society, as these issues pertained to various ethnic and cultural groups in American society. 3. Synthesize and critique diverse sources and incorporate them into projects that address a particular topic.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3550 - Global U.S. History

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
This course places the United States in the historic, political, cultural, and social currents of the world. It invites students to explore the historic processes that have shaped some key themes and dynamics of U.S. history from both internal and external points of view. We will view the United States less as an independent entity and more as a part of a world community. Such a perspective creates an opportunity to deepen the basic narrative of the American experience by internationalizing it, while also helping us understand how such aspects of U.S. society as churches, small businesses, neighborhoods, cultural communities, and mass media might be forces in shaping world politics. We will make the movements of people in and through the Americas, the stories of how the United States came to be 50 states (and some territories), and the precarious role of early 21st century world leadership the central themes of the study. Students are encouraged to bring to this course a curiosity about America's historic place in the world, a desire to strengthen Historical Studies research and writing skills, and a willingness to think outside the box. Learning Outcomes: 1. Interpret the basic narrative of American history as it pertains to the development of the nation as a global power from the nineteenth through early twenty-first centuries. 2. Analyze the role of government, industry, the military and other institutions and other institutions that have aided in the creation of America’s domestic and international strength. 3. Critically evaluate U.S. actions in supporting economic growth and global dominance. 4. Synthesize and critique various sources and incorporate them into clearly-stated conclusions in well-written papers organized around a particular topic
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 3590 - Hip Hop America: The Evolution of a Cultural Movement

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
How do history and Hip Hop connect? This course explores that question through a study of Hip Hop in the U.S. The course will begin with a look at the 1970's Bronx, where Hip Hop originated, and will then journey across New York City and the United States, exploring how the beats and breaks of the Bronx evolved into both an artistic genre as well as a political and cultural movement. We will study 1) the social conditions of the 1970's Bronx that enabled the emergence of Hip Hop; 2) the 1980's growth of the genre through the commercialization of rap; 3) the early 21st century uses of Hip Hop as a vehicle for political organizing, education, community outreach, and entrepreneurialism in cities across the U.S.; 4) the challenge of balancing the political potential of Hip Hop against the commercial context of popular arts; and 5) the harnessing of Hip Hop by churches and other religious organizations as a vehicle for personal uplift and empowerment. Learning Outcomes: 1. Identify and discuss the historical origins of Hip Hop and its development in the United States. 2. Analyze the societal, political, and economic impacts of Hip Hop culture as rooted in its five foundational elements: b-boying/b-girling, deejaying, emceeing, graffiti, and self-growth through knowledge and awareness. 3. Discuss, analyze, and critique Hip Hop philosophy.
Section: 01
4
credits

INDG 3020 - Living History: Little Bighorn from a Cheyenne Perspective

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
In 1876, Cheyenne, Lakota, and Arapaho won the Battle of Little Bighorn, also known as Custer’s Last Stand. After the battle, Cheyenne women took fabric from slain soldiers’ Army coats and made a dress. It holds special meaning since one of Custer’s strategies was to capture women, children, disabled, and elderly and use them as hostages/human shields. The dress was handed down from woman to woman and resides at the Northwest Indian Museum in Washington. It was presented at Little Bighorn Battlefield on the 140th anniversary of the battle by Cheyenne tribal member Cliff Eaglefeathers. Rather than the military engagement, we focus on peoples’ experiences of battle sites as locales that continue to breathe living history. This interdisciplinary study draws from History, Psychology, Archaeology, and Indigenous Studies to address Little Bighorn as an ongoing part of Cheyenne culture and includes on-site videos with Mr. Eaglefeathers and Cheyenne Elders. Learning Outcomes: 1. Apply Indigenous Studies’ approaches to knowledge in order to adapt multiple disciplinary theories and methods (History, Social Science, and Archaeology) 2. Analyze historical trauma and Cheyenne experiences 3. Demonstrate cultural competence through understanding of Cheyenne cultural elements that shape responses to the battle.
Section: 01