HOME » COURSES » SEARCH RESULTS
Displaying courses 461 - 470 of 527 in total
4
credits

INMS 3040 - The African American Experience

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
Along with a survey of African American history, we will introduce a variety of examples and voices to include diverse African American experiences and perspectives. We also introduce the interdisciplinary method that is at the heart of the field. You will learn about several disciplines - history, social science, Black feminism, and cultural studies-that have contributed to Africana Studies. Working between them, you will gain a multi-faceted sense of selected topics that can point you towards an overview of African American history and culture and help shape your own additional studies. Prerequisite(s): Recommended: A United States history course and United States government course. This course partially meets the General Education requirement in American History for all students, but fully meets the General Education requirement in American History for students scoring 85 or above on the New York State Regents exam in United States History and Government. Learning Outcomes: 1. Critically examine and discuss the experiences of African Americans from the era of slavery to the present time. 2. Identify, understand, and appreciate African American traditions in their historical and sociocultural contexts. 3. Read, analyze, and discuss selected readings about African Americans using cultural, historical, sociological, political, and philosophical frameworks.
Section: 01
4
credits

POLI 3005 - America's Founding Ideas

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
The founding of the United States of America is one of the defining events of world history, and the political ideas of the founding generation continue to be invoked all manner of political debate. But questions about the founding generation remain: What did Thomas Jefferson and James Madison really think about politics? How did the American founding generation understand terms like 'liberty,' 'democracy,' and 'freedom?' This course is designed to separate fact from fiction by introducing students to the intellectual, economic, and social context of the American founding. Learning Outcomes: 1.Identify the main themes in American political thinking in the pre-Revolutionary period. 2. Analyze arguments put forth in support of, and in opposition to, various Constitutional structures in early America. 3. Evaluate the origins of contemporary claims regarding the political ideas of the American founding era. .
Section: 01
4
credits

POLI 3105 - The American Presidency

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
This course will examine the office of the American presidency and the operation of the executive branch of the American federal government from a historical perspective. We will analyze the office of the presidency throughout the history of the Republic, identifying patterns of change as well as continuities in presidential power. We will consider the presidency’s design in the Constitution and what factors have led to departures from that framework. Learning Outcomes: 1.Compare administrations from both the traditional period (1789-1932) and the modern presidency era (1933-present). 2. Analyze the presidency from historical, comparative, critical, and analytical perspectives. 3. Identify points of convergence and departure between the powers of the presidency as outlined in the Constitution and the political realities of presidential power.
Section: 01
4
credits

LABR 3072 - United States Labor History

Empire State College / University College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
This course examines the roles of workers and their organizations from colonial American times to the present. The goals are to develop informed and critical analyses of these historical developments and to draw conclusions about them in ways that make sense to the student. Students will critically examine and discuss labor as a form of economic, political, and social expression; will learn how to identify, understand, and appreciate labor traditions in their historical, critical, and socio-cultural contexts; and will learn to differentiate economic, political, social, and organizational traditions. The course will also consider the manner in which both unionized and non-unionized work developed. This will include discussing how gender, race, and ethnicity have influenced workers in America. Course activities require students to observe, discuss and write about labor from critical and analytical perspectives, including cultural, historical, sociological, political, and philosophical frameworks. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course fulfills SUNY American History General Education Requirements. This course is offered online. This course was previously LAB-263704 United States Labor History. Learning Outcomes: 1. Critically examine and discuss the histories of work, the working-class and organized labor in their economic, political, and socio-cultural contexts 2. Assess labor and working-class issues from critical and analytical perspectives and formulate your own analyses of historical events 3. Analyze selected writings about labor using critical, cultural, historical, sociological, political, and philosophical frameworks
Section: 01
3
credits

GOV 121 - American National Experience

Dutchess / Community College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
A course dealing with the philosophy, structure, functions and processes of our national government. Topics include the methods of political and historical analysis, the machinery of government, the political process and political behavior. Historical events and personalities in American politics will be used to illustrate the issues and processes of American government. The course will fulfill the History, Government, Economics requirement for Liberal Arts and Humanities majors and may be designated as either a GOV or a HIS course depending on the needs of the student for transfer.
Section: 63A
3
credits

HIS 104 - History Of The United States II

Dutchess / Community College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
The study of American political, social and intellectual development from 1865 to the present. Topics covered are Reconstruction, the industrial and transportation revolution, the labor movement, the crisis in agriculture, expansion and the new Manifest Destiny, the Progressive Movement, the Twenties, the Great War, the Great Depression and New Deal, the Second World War, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War and the Protest Movements of the 1960s, and the Consolidation and Conservative Resurgence of the 1970s and 1980s. HIS 103 and 104 may be taken separately.
Section: 05A
3
credits

HIS 104 - History Of The United States II

Dutchess / Community College | Spring 2019
January 14, 2019 — 
The study of American political, social and intellectual development from 1865 to the present. Topics covered are Reconstruction, the industrial and transportation revolution, the labor movement, the crisis in agriculture, expansion and the new Manifest Destiny, the Progressive Movement, the Twenties, the Great War, the Great Depression and New Deal, the Second World War, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War and the Protest Movements of the 1960s, and the Consolidation and Conservative Resurgence of the 1970s and 1980s. HIS 103 and 104 may be taken separately.
Section: 62A
3
credits

AAS 261LEC - African American History

Buffalo, University at / University Center | Winter 2018-19
January 4, 2019 — 
Surveys the history of African Americans from African origins to the present. The course focuses on the often overlooked but crucial role of African Americans in shaping US and world history. Topics include: West African civilizations, the slave trade and slavery, abolitionism and the Underground Railroad, Emancipation, post-slavery migrations and labor systems, the rise of Jim Crow, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement and Black Power.
Section: A
3
credits

HIS 161LR - United States History I

Buffalo, University at / University Center | Winter 2018-19
January 4, 2019 — 
This is not your high school history class. We won't ignore presidents and generals but we will also push beyond them to look at ordinary people, popular culture, and the unexpected ideas that shaped American history from Native American settlement to the aftermath of the Civil War. We will pay particular attention to the interaction among Europeans Africans and the Native Peoples of the New World. We will also explore historical methodologies, practice critical thinking, and discuss how this history has shaped the country we know today. We will use film, music, and compelling stories to show that history is not just a list of names and dates; it is a gripping drama of individuals and groups from foot soldiers to farmers striving to create a new nation.
Section: DAX1
3
credits

PSC 101LEC - Introduction to American Politics

Buffalo, University at / University Center | Winter 2018-19
January 4, 2019 — 
Explores the theory and practice of the American political system; the three government branches, federalism, political parties, groups in the electoral and governmental process, public policy making, and contemporary political problems.
Section: KAP