HOME » COURSES » SEARCH RESULTS
Displaying courses 61 - 70 of 395 in total
3
credits

HIS 150 - American History to 1877

Jefferson / Community College | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
This course provides a survey of the major social, economic, political, cultural, and intellectual dynamics that have shaped the American experience through Reconstruction. It is recommended that students take this course only after completing any required noncredit coursework in reading (CLS).
Section: 1
3
credits

HIS 151 - American History 1877 to Present

Jefferson / Community College | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
This course provides a survey of the major social, economic, political, cultural, and intellectual dynamics that have shaped the American experience since Reconstruction. It is recommended that students take this course only after completing any required noncredit coursework in reading (CLS).
Section: 1
4
credits

JUST 351 - Jewish New York

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
An exploration of why Eastern European Jews came to New York in the era of mass migration and what they made of city life once they arrived. Jewish New York is a study in both urban and immigrant history: examining how a newly arrived society shaped and responded to America's signature metropolis in an urban moment of extraordinary dynamism.
Section: 01
4
credits

ITAL 481U - The Immigration Experience

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
This course will examine the immigration experience as reflected in literary works of various genres, and seek to identify the unifying characteristics of the works of immigrant writers: What experiences are universal to immigrants from a wide variety of sending countries and cultures? What is lost and what gained in the assimilation and integration processes? How did different ethnic groups respond to the process and how are the similarities and differences reflected in the literary documents they have produced? What does it mean to write about the immigration process and how does the act of writing serve to validate and/or work through certain experiences and ordeals common to most immigrants? Some of the common themes we will examine are: prejudice and racism, exploitative labor, and the female immigrant's role within the family structure as it contrasts with the old world conception of a woman's place in the home and community.
Section: 01
4
credits

HDEV 423 - Multicultural Counseling

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
This course provides students with an opportunity to develop an understanding of multicultural counseling and therapy. The focus of this course is to have students develop their awareness/consciousness, knowledge, and clinical skills in relation to racial/cultural dynamics as these factors have an impact on the therapeutic relationships between mental health practitioners and clients of racially/culturally diverse groups. A key emphasis will be placed on how the intersectionality of race; ethnicity; gender, gender identity, and gender expression; social class; immigration status; and sexuality have had an impact on larger societal processes that relate to inequalities. Students will examine multicultural issues that influence the therapeutic relationship such as racial/ethnic identity development, cultural worldviews, cultural responsiveness, and multicultural ethical considerations. Students will develop awareness to the dynamics of power and powerlessness that have an impact on the client/mental health practitioner interaction. Students will explore perceptions about their own racial/ethnic/cultural background as well as that of others.
Section: 01
4
credits

HIST 380F - American Women, American Wars

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
General George Patton once said, “Wars may be fought with weapons, but they are won by men. It is the spirit of men who follow and of the man who leads that gains the victory.” In many ways, American women are typically remembered in mainstream modern culture as peripheral actors in American wars, although the historiography is quickly amending this misconception! This course asks how, and in what capacity, women served in and for the military and on the homefront during wartime, contributed through fundraising, nursing, or aid organizations, or even participated in anti-war demonstrations. “American Women, American Wars” will challenge students to consider how women navigated social, political, and military obstacles in a historically male-dominated realm: war. Beyond discovering the ways in which women were actively present and participating in wartime conflict and culture, students will examine how women helped to shape public memory of American soldiers and the legacy of American wars through monuments, museums, and public ceremonies. Special attention will be given to discussing how recurring themes of American wars and women relate to current issues about women and wartime, including the military gender integration debate, citizenship, sexual assault and rape culture in the military, and PTSD and mental health treatment. Primary sources, popular films and documentaries, and virtual field trips will accompany secondary source readings that address how American women impacted wartime culture and memory. Students will engage in regular discussion threads to respond to primary sources, complete quizzes based on readings, and record podcasts to critique film and media units. Students will also conduct an independent authentic project such as an oral history interview, a singular historical newspaper issue, a sketch/critique of a museum or monument that matches the course themes, or another project of their own creation. To conclude the course, students will select one military campaign for their major writing assignment and incorporate both primary and secondary sources into a comprehensive, original historical argument or commentary about American women and war.
Section: 01
4
credits

PLSC 382J - Inequality And Representation

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
Are all voices in the U.S. heard equally by their representatives? Or do the current structures of campaign finance and elections ensure representation only for the wealthiest? This class will center on these questions and attempt to understand the growing economic division in the U.S. and what it means for who gets represented.
Section: 01
4
credits

ECON 144 - Economics Of Poverty And Discrimination

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
This course is a module-based, topics-driven course, in which we examine the dual phenomena of poverty and discrimination largely through the framework of traditional economics models of human behavior. Students explore a number of key topics pertaining to the two social issues of poverty and discrimination in a multi-dimensional fashion. We begin with daily electronic posts, which should help the students progress through the assigned readings; and each topic concludes with students participating in blog discussions, which are intended to encourage personal interaction and enhanced appreciation for the complexity of the issues we shall explore. The course materials on poverty focus on the 'causes of poverty' and the 'associated policy options to relieve poverty.' Course material on discrimination explore 'the roots of discrimination' and evaluates the [non]potential of markets to alleviate such practices where deemed rational. Each topic covered in the course will have a corresponding reading that is to be finished before moving on to the next topic, followed by assignments. In conjunction with the readings, some notes and questions on important concepts shall also be posted. Working out the answers to these questions shall aid the students in understanding the readings
Section: 01
4
credits

HDEV 374 - Psychology of HIV And AIDS

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
This course will examine psychological aspects of the AIDS epidemic in the United States with a focus on psychological theory and research in this area. Students also will explore the complexities of the AIDS epidemic within the context of the politics of health. A specific emphasis will be placed on a critique of micro- and macro- level processes that influence inequalities in AIDS based on race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexualities. Students will engage in critical analysis and thoughtful reflection in exploring and challenging their values, assumptions, perceptions, and biases related to AIDS. The course will focus on societal processes from the perspective of four groups (i.e. Asians, Blacks, Latino/as, Native Americans) and will demonstrate how these groups have experienced and have had an impact on key institutional structures of US society (e.g. legal, political, economic, and educational) with respect to the AIDS epidemic. Within this context, students will examine the following topics: HIV virology, clinical course, medical treatments, epidemiology, and antibody testing; integrating primary and behavioral health care; assessment issues and strategies; intervention strategies; prevention issues for the mental health provider; HIV, mental health, and prisons; the interface of HIV and substance use; and HIV in the Greater Binghamton area. Students should provide considerable preparation in planning and structuring their schedules for the rigors of this course. This course requires that students complete pre- and post-course readings and assignments.
Section: 01
4
credits

PSYC 380C - Psychology of HIV And AIDS

Binghamton / University Center | Winter 2019-20
December 16, 2019 — 
This course will examine psychological aspects of the AIDS epidemic in the United States with a focus on psychological theory and research in this area. Students also will explore the complexities of the AIDS epidemic within the context of the politics of health. A specific emphasis will be placed on a critique of micro- and macro- level processes that influence inequalities in AIDS based on race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexualities. Students will engage in critical analysis and thoughtful reflection in exploring and challenging their values, assumptions, perceptions, and biases related to AIDS. The course will focus on societal processes from the perspective of four groups (i.e. Asians, Blacks, Latino/as, Native Americans) and will demonstrate how these groups have experienced and have had an impact on key institutional structures of US society (e.g. legal, political, economic, and educational) with respect to the AIDS epidemic. Within this context, students will examine the following topics: HIV virology, clinical course, medical treatments, epidemiology, and antibody testing; integrating primary and behavioral health care; assessment issues and strategies; intervention strategies; prevention issues for the mental health provider; HIV, mental health, and prisons; the interface of HIV and substance use; and HIV in the Greater Binghamton area. Students should provide considerable preparation in planning and structuring their schedules for the rigors of this course. This course requires that students complete pre- and post-course readings and assignments.
Section: 01